White Tea: The Least Processed of All Teas

By Jesse Jacobs

whitetea

 

White teas are processed so gently that you can still see the fuzzy hairs on the tea buds. To make white tea, the baby tea buds and tender young leaves of the tea plant are picked, then dried in the sun. After one to three days, they’re baked briefly to halt the oxidation process. That’s it.

The resulting golden-amber infusion is full of vitality, life, and freshness. Sweet, soft, and deep, their light flavor is a soothing balm for dry throats and scattered minds.

Our Bai Mudan White Tea means “white peony” in Chinese. This tea tastes great no matter how you brew it; notes of roasted chestnuts, roses, and sweet corn give way to a woodsy finish.

If you want a light, low-caffeine brew, place a heaping two tablespoons in our Vivid Brewpot and flash brew it with boiling water for just 30 seconds. Or if you want a strong flavor full of umami and vegetal notes, brew it for five minutes with water around 180 degrees F. (boil water than let it cool for about five minutes).

When you’re done enjoying your tea, don’t just chuck the leaves into the trash–take a pinch of the spent leaves and examine them. Appreciate the full leaves, so recently growing in the mountains of Fujian, China. Appreciate the farmers who carefully picked each leaf. And appreciate yourself, for taking the time to relax and savor a good cup of tea.

If you’d like to learn more about tea, check out our Ultimate Beginner’s Guide to Tea video series, or sign up for a Private Tea Class at the Tea Lounges.

5 Things You Didn’t Know About Tea

By Jesse Jacobs
1. All tea comes from the same plant. Whether black tea, white tea, oolong tea, green tea, or pu-erh tea, it all comes from the camellia sinensis plant. The varietals, oxidation level, and processing techniques differentiate each type of tea. Herbal blends are actually not “real” tea, since they come from other botanicals. 2. It’s…

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